Automated Guided Vehicles, or AGVs, have been in existence since the 1950s, although they have undergone considerable improvements in engineering since that time. When Barrett Electronics debuted the first AGV, it was guided by a wire in the floor and performed onlyh simple towing tasks. Up until recently, AGVs have been used primarily in industrial manufacturing environments where they performed repetitive tasks in defined surroundings with specific constants. Today’s AGVs range on a spectrum of complexity from that same simple machine that moves parts from one defined location to another to machines that are capable of working with each other in fleets, navigating over rough terrain. Let’s explore what makes AGVs in such high demand now.

Flexible - The flexible technology used in AGVs have rendered them useful for many different tasks. It’s difficult to relocate or shift a conveyor system, but with the wireless technology AGVs use, it’s relatively simple and quick to remap a route and continue production. Today complex AGVs are equipped with sensors, clamping mechanisms, positioning fixtures, and tool attachments and, as such, are useful across a variety of sectors in many industries, including healthcare, military, and transportation. They can work alone or in tandem with other AGVs.   

Accurate - AGV computer systems can be coordinated with warehouse management systems. This allows for companies to track every detail of material handling and make adjustments to increase accuracy and efficiency. An AGV will do as it is programmed to do each and every time. It will never get bored by repetitive tasks or distracted by workplace or social activity.

Safe - AGVs can operate in a number of environments that otherwise might be hazardous for people, including those with exposure to extreme temperatures, gases, chemicals, sharp objects, or biological contaminants. A damaged AGV can be repaired or replaced without the same problems or liabilities worker injuries or health hazards create for companies and people.

Productive - AGVs can work continuously around the clock without breaks. They do not get sick. They will do a task continuously for as long as necessary without flagging or complaining. They maintain a constant speed, never hurrying or rushing to complete a task before the end of the work period.

Much has been made lately about AGVs and other types of automation replacing people in the workplace and what that means for society and the economy. This is true in some cases, but it’s also true that AGVs will do work that people cannot or will not do. In these cases AGVs are a win-win solution for everyone because their work must be monitored, adjusted, or completed by human workers who are then employed to do it. As manufacturers upgrade their facilities to become smarter and more efficient, AGVs will play a larger and more important part in day-to-day operations. We have only begun to see what AGVs are capable of doing in the workplace.






Manufacturing Day

 

The first Friday in October is Manufacturing Day, and it’s a celebration of modern manufacturing, highlighting what is great in the industry today in an effort to educate students, workers, the business community, the media, and politicians about how essential manufacturing is to the economy. This year that day, the sixth annual Manufacturing Day, is October 6, 2017.

On this day many manufacturers open their doors to the public, offering plant tours so that people can understand what exactly it is they do and how our everyday lives depend on the parts and products made in factories locally, nationally, and worldwide. Manufacturing has changed a great deal since Henry Ford began rolling Model Ts off of his assembly lines, and it’s responsible for bringing jobs back to America today. While robots and AGVs are becoming a part of nearly every factory floor, there are still jobs that need filling for workers of every level of education.

In American 12 million people are employed in manufacturing, and the industry supports 17.4 million jobs nationwide. By the year 2018 STEM manufacturing jobs are predicted to grow to 8.65 million. Unfortunately, workers in the Baby-Boomer and Generation-X generations make up 80% of those employed currently. Millennials and even younger people need to know about the opportunities manufacturing offers in terms of employment and opportunity. This is why Manufacturing Day is so important.

A healthy manufacturing sector creates jobs well beyond its own sphere, many of them skilled. Researchers’ and scientists’ work both depends on and influences manufacturing. Computer programming and software development jobs are created by the industry. Manufacturing also needs engineers, production workers, and technicians who can fix machines when they break down, and because all of these jobs are necessary to produce the products of the future, wages and benefits tend to be generous for those positions.

The State of Michigan has a program that is designed to help fill those positions in the future. The Skilled Trades Training Fund (STTF) has been providing funding for training and currently is giving $27 million in grants to companies that help their workers gain more skilled training. This money can be used both for current employees or new hires. Companies need only contact their Michigan Works! business liaison and apply for these grants. They have until October 6, 2017 to get their applications in.

Manufacturers need to be proactive and think outside of the box to find and train the workers they need both for today and tomorrow. What is your company doing to celebrate Manufacturing Day this year?





D+M Metal Products would like to share with our customers and readers the opportunity to help the kids of West Michigan go to camp next summer. “Run for Camp” is a fundraiser that three local camps - Camp Roger, Camp Geneva, and Camp Henry - are partnering together in order to give more kids the opportunity to experience camp for themselves.

This 5K event will take place on Saturday, September 16th, at Camp Henry on Kimball Lake in Newaygo. The trail is easy to run, jog, or walk, weaving alongside pasture and meadow land and finishing at the lake shore. The race starts at 10 AM rain or shine and costs $25 for adults and $15 for kids. There will be a party afterwards for all participants, and all participants’ guests are welcome to cheer their friends and family on.

The cooperative goal of all three camps in hosting this event is to raise money so that all West Michigan kids can go to camp, even if their families do not have the resources to afford all or part of the cost. The leaders and staff of Camps Roger, Henry, and Geneva believe that camp is an important experience for kids both developmentally and socially. Getting exercise and exploring nature are crucial for the health and well-being of children, and all three camps provide an amazing, positive, loving, fun-filled, and life changing Christian camping experience for their campers.

This past summer, between these three facilities, 8,000 kids attended camp, and over the past four years these three camps have provided over $1 million in scholarship assistance to give kids the chance to experience it. Due to the generous support of sponsors, 100% of the proceeds from Run for Camp go directly into each camp's scholarship fund.

Camp Roger’s overnight camp is located northeast of Grand Rapids in Rockford, Michigan, and recently opened a new day camp in Howard City, Camp Scottie. During the summer both facilities function as camps, and during the year Camp Roger serves local schoolchildren in exploring outdoor education while Camp Scottie serves as a retreat center.

Bob Buist is a former camper, counselor, and a lifelong supporter of Camp Roger, and D+M Metal was pleased leave its mark there by creating and manufacturing a floor sculpture in the new Ridge Hall built in 2016.

Camp can make a huge difference in a kid’s life. If you would like to take part in Run for Camp, you can sign up here. Volunteers to help with race day are also needed, and that signup is here. If you would like to hear an interview GVSU’s Shelley Irwin did with all three camps’ directors, discussing why they believe camp is important, that is available online as well. Click here to listen to the interview!

 

Did you know that D+M Metal has created many beautiful sculptures? We have done floor sculptures that have been installed in high schools throughout West Michigan and at Camp Roger as well as full sculpture pieces that have been installed in Grand Rapids, Grandville, and places as far away as Orlando, Florida. D+M Metal has worked with a number of artists, including Ed Bouvé and Mary Gillis, to translate their artistic visions into metal, including these:

In 2012 we received a commission from Dwelling Place for their condominium on Hall St. built for seniors. We worked with artist Ed Bouvé to create “Reflections,” a stainless steel mirror image sculpture. This beautiful piece is designed to physically reflect its relationship to Dwelling Place residents.

Vention Medical commissioned a sculpture to interpret their inventions and production of heart surgical instruments. The result is a 25-foot tall stainless steel complex that is mounted on a tall granite pedestal at Seward and Watson St., S.E. in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Enlaced: A Burning Bush,” an 18-foot tall steel and 7-foot wide scupture, stands on the campus of Dordt College in Iowa. Dordt College art professor David Versluis translated his interpretation of Psalm 19 into a metal sculpture. He had this to say about Enlaced:

“The design of this sculpture grows out of the intertwining of a Christian perspective that’s found in Dordt College’s academic community. Gideon Strauss once described that perspective this way: “The love of God evokes—from our whole person and in unity with the whole people of God—a life of worship, a love of our neighbors, and a respectful caring and disclosure of all of creation.”

The seven upright metallic forms of “Enlaced” symbolize both the classic liberal arts and the seven branches of the Hebraic temple lamp stand (which itself is thought to symbolize the burning bush Moses saw as recorded in Exodus 3). D+M Metal engineers translated Versluis’ designs into CNC machine code, cut all of the components, and then welded them together. COR-TEN® steel was used because it will rust to a consistent patina. The effect here looks red very much like a burning bush. The sculpture was sandblasted, then moved to Dordt College where it was welded on site and installed.

If you’ve ever driven by D+M Metal Products at 4994 West River Dr. in Comstock Park, Michigan, you may have seen our own stainless steel sculpture, “Trivium and Quadrivium.” We commissioned this one as an interpretation of our own steel fabrication work.

D+M Metal does a broad spectrum of work with steel, and we can work with any artist to make their ideas become a reality. We are very proud of both the artistry and the usefulness of what our expert engineers and machine operators produce every day, from the practical to the beautiful.



The world is rapidly changing, and all research about social conditions in contemporary America point to people getting more and more isolated from each other. In fact, this decline in America’s social capital is the entire focus of Robert Putnam’s famous book Bowling Alone.  

Millennials are markedly less likely to attend church or belong to a religious organization than their parents or grandparents were. Families are small and more fractured than they used to be, and people spend far more time on their phones and personal devices searching out entertainment rather than building personal relationships or even just hanging with friends. In 2014 the National Science foundation reported that more than a quarter of the 1,500 Americans they interviewed “said that they have no one with whom they can talk about their personal troubles or triumphs.” In short, people are lonely. They are desperately lonely today.

Lonely people burn out far more easily in both their personal lives and at work. Life throws challenges at all of us - whether that means relationship problems, financial difficulties, health issues, work stresses, grief or loss. These are not things the people handle well on their own. Human beings aren’t built to handle problems alone. They’re naturally social, but the social networks that force people to socialize even when they don’t feel like it or want to and that keep people accountable and standing when life tries to knock them down are disappearing.

D+M Metal is investing in our workers’ mental and social health by bringing in chaplains for a summer lunchtime series.

 

June 14     Dealing with Anxiety

June 28     Why forgive?

July 12      Finding Hope in a Hopeless World

July 26      Faith and Doubt

August 9   Dealing with Chronic Illness

August 23  Handling Finances

 

Chaplains offer a trained professional ear to people. Talking about problems is in itself therapeutic, but chaplains are also capable of recommending other services or advice that could help in solving problems. This is important for people who feel they are alone or dealing with issues no one around them is.  Furthermore, encouraging employees to get to know each other also can help create workplace bonds between people who may offer support and encouragement in future crises.

D+M’s presenters will be Chaplains Jim Tait and Carol Petter. Each session will address a real-life issue, and will be conversational and informal. Questions and comments are encouraged before, during and after each session. No one is obligated to come, but all of our employees are welcome. We are glad to be able to offer this service. It’s one way our company is paying it forward into tomorrow!